Brian Morris

Host of All Things Considered, Reporter

Brian Morris began working with WCAI in 2005 as an independent reporter/producer, and joined the staff full time in December, 2013. He has contributed to the station's “Creative Life” series, produced the “Nautical Minutes” series of :60 vignettes about nautical life on the Cape and Islands, reported on South Coast issues, and provided field production support for "The Point." He is host of WCAI's All Things Considered.

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J.J.

In the studio to discuss the week's top news stories, including controversy over tree cutting along Route 6 on the Upper Cape, precautions in Cape Cod hospitals against Ebola, a shark tagging expedition in Chatham, and recommendations about a former military rocket range on Nantucket.

Brian Morris/WCAI

New Bedford’s textile mills once churned out fabric 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Some of the old mills have been torn down, but others survive as artist spaces, outlets and apparel manufacturers. About a half dozen of the red brick structures have been restored and turned into high-end apartments. Manomet Place in New Bedford’s North End is one example. 

Brian Morris/WCAI

Driving through New Bedford along Route 195, it’s hard not to notice the long red brick buildings on either side of the highway. These are the old textile mills, built mostly in the early 1900’s. They’re a familiar part of the landscape, but many people don’t know the stories these buildings have to tell: of the immigrant workers who came here by the thousands; of the working conditions they faced; of a textile industry that exploded in New Bedford and then faded just as quickly; and of the present-day debate about whether to save these buildings or tear them down. 

Brian Morris/WCAI

A new solar energy farm in New Bedford is designed to power more than 200 homes. But this particular solar array sits atop a Superfund site. And it's taken a lot of coordinated effort at the local, State and Federal levels to make the project happen. 

On a crisp and clear Friday afternoon, more than 5,000 sleek new solar panels slant skyward at the 11-acre Sullivan's Ledge site in New Bedford. With New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell and others looking on, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy touted the fact that a polluted site could now be put to good use.

Brian Morris/WCAI

The popular PBS TV show “Thomas and Friends” has sparked the imagination of young children for generations.  Each summer, railroad amusement park Edaville USA in Carver hosts a “Day Out With Thomas” weekend that includes a ride on a train pulled by Thomas the Tank Engine himself. And the experience is about to get a whole lot bigger. Construction is underway on Thomas Land, a new Thomas theme park on the grounds of Edaville. The new park isn’t much to look at now, but by this time next year, it’ll be the biggest Thomas Land in the world. 

On the warm morning of July 21, 1918, during the last year of the First World War, a German submarine surfaced three miles off the coast of Cape Cod and attacked an unarmed towboat and her four barges. A handful of the shells fired by the U-boat’s two deck guns struck Nauset Beach, giving the modest town of Orleans the distinction of being the first and only spot in the United States to receive fire from the enemy during the entire World War.

onedayu.com

A busy week of local and regional news.  WCAI's Brian Morris hosts a discussion with colleagues in the print and digital media.  Among the stories: Cape Cod may take in unaccompanied immigrant kids; Cape Wind looks at options for its staging facilities in both Rhode Island and New Bedford; a new director and manager for Chatham's town band; a booming Nantucket real estate market; Provincetown licensing board denies bid to use the Hawthorne Barn for Tennessee Williams festival performance; and a name for the new Steamship Authority ferry.

Alecia Orsini/WCAI

The Charles W. Morgan is towed through the Cape Cod Canal Wednesday morning on its way to Provincetown, the next stop on its 38th Voyage.

WCAI/Brian Morris

We join WCAI's Brian Morris at the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge in Chatham, home to one of the largest colony of roseate terns on the Eastern Seaboard. Wildlife Biologist Kate Iaquinto, and Libby Hurland, Project Leader of the Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge Complex, take us on a tour of roseate tern and laughing gull nesting sites.

WCAI/Brian Morris

Vineyard Haven harbor resounded with cheers, ship horns and cannon blasts as well-wishers turned out to greet the Charles W. Morgan when it arrived in Martha’s Vineyard from Newport, Rhode Island. The 173-year old vessel is America’s last surviving whale ship. It’s based at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut, and recently underwent a 5-1/2 year restoration there. The Morgan is traveling around New England this summer on its 38th Voyage, stopping at ports where it has strong ties. This is the first time the Morgan has sailed since its last whaling voyage in 1921. 

Brian Morris/WCAI

Many parents find they’re unable to spend enough quality time with their kids during the week. The pressures of work and other obligations often makes that difficult, if not impossible. This is especially true for parents and students at the Hannigan School in New Bedford. These students are attending classes at a facility two miles away from their regular school building, while it undergoes extensive renovations But a new program gives these students and their families a chance to re-connect on weekends by cultivating gardens together. 

Brian Morris

Charles “Stormy” Mayo is one of the founders of the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, an organization well known for its pioneering whale research and other types of ocean science. But Stormy Mayo is also an avid boat builder – so avid, in fact, that he’s been building a schooner in the small side yard of his Provincetown home on and off for the last 38 years. And today, that schooner was finally ready to be taken from that side yard to its new home in the waters of Cape Cod Bay. Reporter Brian Morris was there and has this report.

WCAI/Brian Morris

On Route 28 in Yarmouth -- a Cape Cod thoroughfare lined with taffy shops and seafood-themed restaurants -- is a large hulk of a building long past its heyday that most everyone agrees needs to go away. But not so long ago, this eyesore was known as the Mill Hill Club. It was an entertainment venue, and back during the 1970s and ‘80s, the club was as good a reason to come to Cape Cod as the beaches. But this Tuesday morning, town officials and representatives from the business community began smashing at it with sledgehammers. And then the bulldozer took over.

Robert Krulwich is co-host of Radiolab, the unconventional and innovative radio program that’s all about science – although sometimes you may not know it. He’s had a long and varied career in both radio and television, and recently WCAI's Brian Morris sat down with Robert Krulwich for a conversation about his unique brand of storytelling.

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