Heather Goldstone

Science Editor and Host of Living Lab

Heather Goldstone is science editor at WCAI and host of Living Lab on The Point, a weekly show exploring how science gets done and makes its way into our daily lives. Goldstone holds a Ph.D. in ocean science from M.I.T. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and spent a decade as researcher before leaving the lab to pursue journalism. She has reported extensively on Woods Hole’s unique scientific community and key environmental issues on Cape Cod. Her stories have appeared in outlets ranging from Cape Cod Times and Commercial Fishery News to NPR and PBS News Hour. Most recently, Goldstone hosted Climatide.org, an NPR-sponsored blog exploring present-day impacts of climate change on coastal life.

Ways to Connect

Sgt. 1st Class Gordon Hyde / Wiki Commons / https://bit.ly/2tM5qo9

Some new research may help us understand the divide over President Trump’s zero tolerance immigration policy. While the majority of Americans found the practice of separating families at the border objectionable, about a quarter of Americans supported the practice.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The federal agency that regulates what happens on, and in, the oceans is making some major policy changes, including some tweaks to its mission statement. That agency is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with science correspondent and Living Lab Host Heather Goldstone to learn more. 

inventingtomorrowmovie.com

Laura Nix, film director, talks to Heather Goldstone on Living Lab about her new movie Inventing Tomorrow. It’s about teenage science innovators from around the globe who are creating cutting-edge solutions to confront the world’s environmental threats. 

Jackman Chiu / unsplash

We all know we feel better when we’re well-rested, but why do we sleep? And how much is enough?

Jeff Janowski, UNCW

Great white sharks have started filtering back into Massachusetts waters. Researchers are pretty sure food is what brings them here, but it’s hard to know for sure what sharks are thinking.

Michał Parzuchowski / unsplash

In the past two months, more than 2,300 immigrant children have been separated from their parents after crossing into the U.S. from Mexico. President Trump has issued an executive order ending the practice, but it’s not clear when or how the previously separated families will be reunited.

Some scientists worry they will have less access to large data sets now that net neutrality is gone.
NOAA (http://bit.ly/2K0YcWE)

It’s official – the net neutrality rules put into place by the FCC in 2015 went away on April 23 after being repealed by the Trump Administration in December.

Elsa Partan

There’s a lot of advice out there about how to be happy – websites, videos, newsletters – and many pedal a recipe for happiness backed by science.

But neuroscientist Dean Burnett started to notice that a lot of it wasn’t very scientific at all. It bugged him so much that he decided to write a book about it, Happy Brain: Where Happiness Comes From and Why.

Dikaseva / unsplash

It was on again, off again but President Trump did meet with North Korean leader Kim Jung Un, and they agreed to denuclearizing the Korean peninsula. What that means is still unclear, but a new study has some advice for all nuclear nations: limit your arsenal to 100 weapons.

A French company has completed the first round of human trials for a new Lyme vaccine. It could be another five years before it comes to market.
Neil R - Flickr (http://bit.ly/2JVfNMg)

It’s hard to believe, but we actually had a vaccine for Lyme disease in the 1990’s.

It was pulled from the market in 2002 after a class action lawsuit alleged that it infected people with Lyme rather than protecting them from it.

The government didn't find any evidence of that, but it’s taken 15 years for a drug developer to get close to getting a new one to market. 

If you go into the backyard after dusk this time of year, you may get treated to the greenish yellow flashes of the firefly. But what do the flashes mean?

"We are looking at the silent love songs of male fireflies," explained Sara Lewis, Professor of Evolutionary and Behavioral Ecology at Tufts University

Summer is nearly here and it's time to pack your beach reading. We're getting a little help from Jenny Rohn, a cell biologist at University College London, founder of the science advocacy group Science is Vital, editor of LabLit.com, and a novelist in her own right.

Here is her selection of fun summer novels in which scientists are the main characters.

Walk into a wine shop today and you’ll likely find hundreds of brands and vintages, but most of them will be made from a handful of grape varieties grown in a handful of wine-making hot spots, like France, Italy, California, and Australia. 

One might think that's because those are the best wine grapes and the best places to grow them, but wine has been grown and made in a wide range of places for thousands of years.

NOAA

Massachusetts saw high tide flooding in dramatic style up and down the coastline during storms in January and March. In total, Boston saw a record-breaking 22 days of high tide flooding over the course of the past year, according to a new report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The lead author of the report, William Sweet, says the frequency of coastal flooding has doubled, and it’s a clear result of climate change.

Fish croquettes that were grown in a lab, not in a fish. Likely the most expensive fish dish ever consumed.
Finless Foods

Soon, you may be able to eat hamburger that was grown in a Petri dish rather than on a cow.

In his book, Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World, author Paul Shapiro details how start ups like Memphis Meats and Finless Foods are growing animal cells in the lab that are safe to eat.

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