Kathryn Eident

Morning Edition Host & Senior Producer of News

Kathryn Eident is an award-winning journalist and hosts WCAI's Morning Edition. She began producing stories for WCAI in 2008 as a Boston University graduate student reporting from the Statehouse. Since then, Kathryn’s work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Cape Cod Times, Studio 360, Scientific American, and Cape and Plymouth Business Magazine.

She also worked in commercial radio, first as a reporter, then news director, at Cape Cod Broadcasting, four commercial radio stations in Hyannis. In between, Kathryn spent several years sailing as a deckhand and mess attendant on Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution research ships, and has written for the Institution’s magazine, Oceanus.

Ways to Connect

Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Some Cape business owners were caught off guard earlier this year when they got a sudden, unexpected bill from the state—a penalty for employees who qualify for Mass Health or the Health Connector, instead of employer-offered plans.

weather.gov

A new local insurance plan could provide some Cape homeowners with an alternative to the Massachusetts Fair Plan—that’s the insurer of last resort for homeowners who can’t get a policy on the commercial insurance market.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The federal agency that regulates what happens on, and in, the oceans is making some major policy changes, including some tweaks to its mission statement. That agency is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with science correspondent and Living Lab Host Heather Goldstone to learn more. 

Governor Charlie Baker was set Thursday to sign the so-called "Grand Bargain"--legislation to avoid having three controversial questions on November's ballot. At the same time, Beacon Hill lawmakers were scrambling this week to wrap up a budget to get on Baker's desk. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House Reporter Mike Deehan to hear more. 

J. Junker

Kathryn Eident hosts this week's installment of the Weekly News Roundup on The Point, as we sail into summertime. Stories  include: ongoing troubles at the Steamship Authority,  accounting errors that led to Brewster's Town Administrator's resignation, and celebrating the Martha's Vineyard High School Girls' tennis team, which just won its fourth state championship in a row. 

State lawmakers rushed a bill through Thursday that effectively pushed some hot-button questions off the November ballot. 

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with State House Reporter Mike Deehan to understand better what House and Senate lawmakers were trying to accomplish. 

Kathryn Eident / WCAI-FM

Earlier this year, China revamped its policies on how much contamination it would accept from recycling imports, and the changes are already starting to affect the recycling chain here in the U.S.

Wikicommons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sagamore_Bridge_-_South_Westerly_View.jpg

U.S. Senator Ed Markey was on the Cape late last week for a lengthy meeting with the Army Corps of Engineers. The topic: finding a way to fund building two new bridges to replace the aging Bourne and Sagamore bridges. WCAI's Kathryn Eident spoke with reporter Sarah Tan to learn more.   

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan about the latest happenings on Beacon Hill. This week, they discuss the so-called "Red Flag Bill" and the state Democratic Convention results.

Eident: Joining us as he does most weeks live from Boston is WCAI State House reporter Mike Deehan. Morning Mike.

Deehan: Good morning.

Town of Dennis

Officials in Dennis, Yarmouth and Harwich have proposed creating a tri-town entity to manage wastewater. Town Meetings in each of the towns approved the idea last month, but there is still a long way to go. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Dennis Board of Selectmen Chairman Paul McCormick to learn more.  

Courtesy of the Cape Cod Cooperative Extension

We're now deep within the active period for ticks on the Cape, Coast and Islands, and many of them harbor illnesses that can make humans sick--including Lyme, Babesiosis, Anaplasmosis and other diseases with sobering names. 

WCAI Morning Edition Host Kathryn Eident talked with Cape Cod Cooperative Extension Entomologist Larry Dapsis about this year's tick population, and how to protect ourselves.

Wikicommons creative commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lymantria_dispar_MHNT_Fronton_Male.jpg

The trees have leafed out across the Cape, islands and SouthCoast. In past years, those green leaves were quickly eaten up by gypsy and winter moths. WCAI's Kathryn Eident visited with Cape Cod Cooperative Extension Entomologyst Larry Dapsis to learn if we might see the same results this year.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House Reporter about the week's biggest news on Beacon Hill. This week, they talk about the Senate's budget process, the so-called Red Flag bill, and other legislation of interest. 

juliancyr.com

The Massachusetts Senate recently passed a series of amendments in a supplemental budget aimed at shoring up the state's finances for the rest of the fiscal year. That included an amendment filed by Cape Sen. Julian Cyr (D-Truro) to provide a more consistent source of funding for police departments to provide officer training.

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident talked with Cyr to learn more.

 

U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Chatham's Board of Selectmen has been pressuring U.S. Representative Bill Keating (D-Mass.) to continue his efforts to return a stretch of ocean off the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge to state and local control. Those waters were put under federal control when officials redrew boundaries in 2016, impacting some areas used for fishing. Chatham selectmen say efforts seem to have stalled, and even went as far as to put out a call to action to residents last week.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Morning Edition Producer Hayley Fager to learn more. 

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