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A look at this year's Razzies winners

SCOTT DETROW, HOST:

There is one multiple award-winning movie that is definitely not winning any Oscars tonight. The horror flick "Winnie-The-Pooh: Blood And Honey" has the dubious honor of cleaning up at this year's Golden Raspberry Awards, known as the Razzies for short. NPR's Chloe Veltman is here to talk about this much-reviled film, as well as the other booby prize-winners at the annual celebration of the worst of Hollywood. Hey, Chloe.

CHLOE VELTMAN, BYLINE: Hey, Scott.

DETROW: "Winnie-The-Pooh: Blood And Honey" - I guess my question is just, why?

VELTMAN: Great question. Well, "Winnie-the-Pooh" entered the public domain in January 2022, as it happens, which opened it up to really any and all sorts of interpretation. And for whatever reason, British filmmaker Rhys Frake-Waterfield decided to reimagine both Pooh and his sidekick Piglet as serial killers out to get their old friend Christopher Robin, his fiance and others. Here's a clip.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "WINNIE-THE-POOH: BLOOD AND HONEY")

MARIA TAYLOR: (As Maria) Christopher, we need to leave now.

NIKOLAI LEON: (As Christopher Robin) I really need to find out...

DETROW: I mean, if you can go infinite directions with this newly liberated property, why not go that direction? I mean (laughter)...

VELTMAN: Yeah. Yeah, why not?

DETROW: How many Razzies did this movie win?

VELTMAN: It won five, Scott...

DETROW: Wow.

VELTMAN: ...Worst picture, worst director, worst screenplay, also worst remake, rip off or sequel. And Pooh and Piglet won the prestigious award for worst screen couple.

DETROW: Can I assume, maybe with some hope, that after a showing like that, we won't see any more of these movies?

VELTMAN: Oh, I'm so sorry to disappoint you, Scott. Actually, there's a sequel. "Winnie-The-Pooh: Blood And Honey 2" is coming out at the end of the month. And in addition to the return of scary Pooh and Piglet, we can also expect to see an equally scary representation of Tigger and Owl.

DETROW: You know, I want to know the answer to this next question, but it's also a topic change to get that image out of my mind. What - remind us what the Razzies are all about.

VELTMAN: So film publicist John Wilson created the Razzies in the 1980s, and his intention was to poke fun at the very sanctimonious Oscars. And that's why it always comes out on the day before the Academy Awards. Only took a few years and it started to draw national attention, and in years past, some stars even showed up to receive their award - a golden, raspberry-shaped trophy - in person. There've been a few people who've won both Razzies and Oscars on the same weekend, notably Sandra Bullock for "The Blind Side" in 2010.

DETROW: What an honor. So in addition to "Winnie-The-Pooh: Blood And Honey" - I guess I have to say it one more time - what are some of the other winners or losers from this year?

VELTMAN: "Expend4bles" got the most nominations of any movie this year, actually - seven in total. But it only won two, both of them for acting. Sylvester Stallone beat Michael Douglas, Mel Gibson, Franco Nero and Bill Murray for worst supporting actor.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "EXPEND4BLES")

SYLVESTER STALLONE: (As Barney) I got this situation where I need your help.

VELTMAN: This is Stallone's 38th Razzie nomination, if you can believe it, Scott, and 12th win.

DETROW: I can.

VELTMAN: And in a rare Razzies feat, Megan Fox won worst supporting actress for her role in this same action-comedy, as well as worst actress for the trigger-happy heist movie "Johnny & Clyde." Here she is.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "JOHNNY & CLYDE")

MEGAN FOX: (As Alana Hart) So you're the only one who knows.

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As character) It's our little secret.

FOX: (As Alana Hart) Great.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNSHOT)

FOX: (As Alana Hart) Two can keep a secret if one of yous (ph) is dead.

VELTMAN: Ugh. Well, Fox was up against some heavyweight Academy Award winners and nominees for this honor, including Salma Hayek for "Magic Mike's Last Dance" and Dame Helen Mirren for "Shazam! Fury Of The Gods."

DETROW: What about the worst actor award?

VELTMAN: Oh, that went to Jon Voight, who's actually won and been nominated for numerous Oscars over the years. He took home worst actor for his performance in the action movie "Mercy."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "MERCY")

JON VOIGHT: (As Patrick Quinn) Perhaps you can help me. I'm looking for my son, Ryan Quinn.

VELTMAN: According to the Razzies video announcement, it might have had something to do with his (imitating bad Irish accent) overwrought attempt at an Irish brogue.

(LAUGHTER)

DETROW: Oh...

VELTMAN: To say nothing of mine.

DETROW: ...You know, it's not in competition with his, so you got that. The Razzies do have one positive award, though, right? Tell us about that.

VELTMAN: Yes. I'm relieved to say that there is something called the Razzie redeemer award, and this year it went to Fran Drescher, actress and current SAG-AFTRA actors' union president, Scott. Fran Drescher was recognized for her bold leadership during the 2023 actors' strike. Of course, Drescher isn't a stranger to the Razzies. She earned a nomination in 1998, actually, for her performance in the comedy "The Beautician And The Beast."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE BEAUTICIAN AND THE BEAST")

FRAN DRESCHER: (As Joy Miller) Ow. Oh, Mr. President, please don't judge me by this. It's just that it's so dark in this castle - great for atmosphere, but it's hell for putting on liquid liner.

TIMOTHY DALTON: (As Boris Pochenko) Make her be quiet.

DRESCHER: (As Joy Miller) I heard him (ph).

VELTMAN: Well, Drescher has obviously come a long way since then.

DETROW: Haven't we all? That's NPR's Chloe Veltman. Thank you so much.

VELTMAN: Real pleasure, Scott. Thanks.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Chloe Veltman
Chloe Veltman is a correspondent on NPR's Culture Desk.