Carrie Kahn

Carrie Kahn is NPR's International Correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. She covers Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central America. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.

Since arriving in Mexico in the summer of 2012, on the eve of the election of President Enrique Peña Nieto and the PRI party's return to power, Kahn has reported on everything from the rise in violence throughout the country to its powerful drug cartels, and the arrest, escape, and re-arrest of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman. She has covered extensively the increasing Central American migration through the region, gang violence in Central America, and the historic détente between the Obama Administration and Cuba.

Prior to her post in Mexico, Kahn had been a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles since joining NPR in 2003. During that time, Kahn often reported on and from Mexico, including covering the country's presidential election in 2012. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and returned to the country on numerous occasions to continue NPR's coverage of the Caribbean nation.

Her work included assignments throughout California and the West. In 2010 Kahn was awarded the Headliner Award for Best in Show and Best Investigative Story for her work covering U.S. informants involved in the Mexican Drug War. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR's extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast, and resettlement of city residents in Houston, TX. Since then, she has covered her share of hurricanes, firestorms and mudslides in Southern California, and the controversial life and death of pop-icon Michael Jackson. In 2008, as China hosted the world's athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler's 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2003, Kahn worked for two and a half years at NPR station KQED in San Francisco, first as an editor and then as a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration reporting. From 1994 to 2001, Kahn was the border and community affairs reporter at NPR station KPBS in San Diego, where she covered Northern Mexico, immigration, cross-border issues, and the city's ethnic communities.

Kahn's work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Kahn received a bachelor's degree in biology from UC Santa Cruz. For several years, she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe, and the Middle East, where she worked on a English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

The Trump administration has one week left to meet a court-ordered deadline to reunite over 2,000 children separated at the border from their families suspected of entering the U.S. illegally.

Logistically, it's going to be tough for the government. The children were sent to dozens of different shelters and foster homes around the United States, in many cases, thousands of miles from their detained parents.

Then there are dozens more parents who've already been deported without their children, further complicating the reunification process.

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President Trump says he called Mexican President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador Monday and spoke for 30 minutes about trade, border security and the fate of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Although Trump has railed against Mexico since his campaign, the U.S. president said he came away upbeat after the talk with his incoming counterpart.

"I think the relationship will be a very good one," Trump said, during a meeting with the prime minister of the Netherlands.

Along with picking a new president in this Sunday's election, Mexicans will also replace every member of Congress and will elect thousands of state representatives and hundreds of new mayors. In that array of candidates are more than 3,000 women, who are vying for elective office in unprecedented numbers. Some Mexicans are calling 2018 "el año de la mujer," the year of the woman.

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If the polls are right, Mexico's next president will be a veteran leftist for whom the third time may very well be the charm.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador is running for president once again. But this time around, it appears his populist message is striking a chord with Mexicans exasperated with disturbing levels of violence and corruption.

Polls now put López Obrador at least 15 points ahead of his nearest rival, Ricardo Anaya of the right-of-center National Action Party.

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And we start in Mexico, where a caravan of hundreds of migrants from Central America has stalled. The migrants had banded together for safety as they tried to make their way north.

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As sexual harassment complaints mounted in the United States against powerful men in Hollywood, politics and the media, Mexico's entertainment industry largely remained silent.

At least, that was the case until a few weeks ago, when it appeared that the #MeToo Movement — Mexico edition — had arrived.

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