climate change

Threshold producer Nick Mott

The U.N.’s most recent special report on climate science was eye-opening for many. But for the four million or so people who live in the Arctic, the potentially catastrophic impacts of rapid global warming are a daily reality more than a shocking headline.

EPA

Much has been said about the lack of science advice reaching the Trump administration. There is still no director of the white house office of science and technology policy – the person who usually serves as the President’s top science advisor. The position of science and technology advisor to the secretary of state is vacant, and the EPA says it plans to eliminate the office of the science advisor to that agency’s administrator.

NOAA

On the heels of the U.N. report released last weekend, Hurricane Michael rekindled the conversation about hurricanes and climate change – transforming in two days from a tropical storm to the strongest hurricane to hit Florida since 1851. There is no question that such rapid intensification is fed by warm ocean temperatures, and that the ocean is warmer now, and will continue to get warmer as a result of our greenhouse gas emissions.  

Humberto Chavez / unsplash

The latest report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concludes that we could cross the threshold of one point five degrees Celsius of global warming as soon as 2030 – just twelve years from now – and besides the devastating impacts of heat waves, droughts, and extreme precipitation, that much warming could trigger irreversible and escalating changes in Artic permafrost and Antarctic ice sheets.

jim gade / unsplash

For at least two decades, scientists have been working to understand what our world would be like if it were – on average – two degrees Celsius warmer than before the industrial revolution. It’s a somewhat arbitrary number – that two degrees - but it came from analyses suggesting it might be a feasible target that would avoid the most catastrophic impacts of climate change.

Martha Dominguez de Gouveia / unsplash

Sustainability has become a major buzzword in the corporate world. In 2015-2016, eighty percent of Fortune 500 companies produced sustainability reports, and seventy percent reported their carbon footprints last year.

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

As hurricane Florence approached the east coast this past week, weather forecasters warned of an historic disaster. But, they didn’t say a lot about why this storm had gotten so big or so powerful.

As Sea Level Rises, Home Values Are Dropping

Aug 27, 2018
Flickr/Putneypics / goo.gl/aQdtm5

A forthcoming paper in the Journal of Financial Economics finds that homes in the way of future sea level rise are selling for less now.

Elizabeth Lies / unsplash

Just over a year ago, NY Magazine’s Daily Intelligencer ran a story by David Wallace-Wells entitled The Uninhabitable Earth. It was a litany of apocalyptic worst-case climate change scenarios that sparked an energetic conversation about the value of shock and fear in motivating climate action. 

Fires burning in Sweden can be seen from space, as in this NASA photo from July 20, 2018.
NASA, https://go.nasa.gov/2vq4PZR

This summer has brought intense heat to much of the Northern Hemisphere and severe wildfires – not only to the American West, but to places like Sweden. Heat waves, droughts and wildfires are all events that climate scientists say are becoming more frequent and severe as a result of human-caused global warming.

Over the past decade, as climate change has been driving increasingly extreme weather around the globe, the political debate in Washington has also grown more extreme.

Republicans, in general, have moved further from the scientific consensus and in their opposition to curbing greenhouse gas emissions. But a growing number of conservatives are moving back in the opposite direction, embracing the science of climate change and proposing free-market solutions.

Samantha Fields

The town of Sandwich is currently trying to pull off the biggest beach nourishment project that’s ever been done on Cape Cod, and one of the biggest in the state.

For more than 100 years, the town’s main beach has been starved of sand by its neighbor, the Cape Cod Canal.  

And that’s left both the beach, and the town, increasingly vulnerable to climate change. 

10,000 Cape Homes At Risk of Chronic Flooding

Jun 18, 2018
Union of Concerned Scientists

 

Warming seas and melting sea ice are causing sea levels to rise, and putting coastal homes at risk of chronic flooding—inundation that happens, on average, 26 times or more per year.

Blish Point Citizens Organize to Fight Floods

Jun 18, 2018
Pien Huang/WCAI

The storm that flooded Tess Korkuch’s neighborhood was six months ago, but the images are fresh in her mind and at her fingertips. She has photos and videos on her phone—a neighbor's bocce court three feet underwater, more water pouring through the streets—and she’s ready to show them to anybody who asks.

NOAA

Massachusetts saw high tide flooding in dramatic style up and down the coastline during storms in January and March. In total, Boston saw a record-breaking 22 days of high tide flooding over the course of the past year, according to a new report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The lead author of the report, William Sweet, says the frequency of coastal flooding has doubled, and it’s a clear result of climate change.

Pages