A Cape Cod Notebook

A Cape Cod Notebook can be heard every Tuesday morning at 8:45am and afternoon at 5:45pm.

Commentary on the unique people, wildlife, and environment of our coastal region. A Cape Cod Notebook commentators include:

Mary Bergman, originally from Provincetown, now lives on Nantucket.  She is a writer and historian, working in historic preservation and writing a novel. 

Nelson Sigelman is an award winning former reporter, outdoor writer and author. He has been honored by the Outdoor Writers Association of America, the New England Outdoor Writers Association and the New England Press Association. His most recent book is Martha’s Vineyard Outdoors, Fishing, Hunting and Avoiding Divorce on a Small Island. He currently works part time for the Tisbury Shellfish Department and lives with his wife Norma in Vineyard Haven.

Susan Moeller - Susan Moeller is a freelance writer and editor who was a reporter and editor with the Boston Herald and Cape Cod Times. She’s lived on the Cape for 45 years and when not working, swims, plays handbells, pretends to garden and walks her dog, Dug. She lives in Cummaquid. 

Dennis Minsky's career as a field biologist began in 1974, at Cape Cod National Seashore, protecting nesting terns and plovers.  A Provincetown resident since 1968, he returned full time in 2005.  He is involved in many local conservation projects, works as a naturalist on the Dolphin Fleet Whale Watch, and tries to write.


 A Cape Cod Notebook is made possible in part with support from Titcomb’s Bookshop on Route 6A in East Sandwich.

In Praise of Downtowns

Dec 19, 2012
: from the movie Voices from the Basement

A nature writer turns his observational powers on the city, as Robert Finch considers Boston's Downtown Crossing. He finds surprises, and cause for wonder, in this urban commercial crossroads, on this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

Gay Head Cliffs. Photo by K. McLeod., NPS

While abundant in many natural effects, Cape Cod provides few treasures to the fossil hunter. Nearby Gay Head is an exception.  But this week, from an unremarkable handful of clay on the Outer Cape, Bob discovers microscopic fossils of ancient sponges, diatoms, and pollen grains.

http://minerdescent.com/2010/05/28/jeremiah-howes/

A walk among the departed of the Howes family at a cemetery in Dennis gives rise to contemplation and speculation, this week on A Cape Cod Notebook.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ginnylgorman/

How did wild turkeys get into the National Seashore?  On A Cape Cod Notebook this week, Bob Finch ponders the much maligned wild turkey, and recounts a near mythic tale of how the wild turkey was re-introduced to Cape Cod and the National Seashore, skirting the letter of the law.

A Piano in the House

Nov 13, 2012

Prognostication

Nov 6, 2012

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch.  Bob points out that he recorded this essay before Superstorm Sandy arrived last week.

A Choir of Coyotes

Oct 30, 2012

Living with coyotes on Cape Cod.

Little Things, part 2

Oct 23, 2012

In part two, Bob continues his recollection of a major event 50 years ago this month – the Cuban missile crisis, when it seemed the United States and Soviet Union were on the brink of nuclear war. Bob was a young reporter for a small newspaper on the Outer Cape then. He wrote a column on the events of that time, calling it “Little Things,” evoking those events that make up our lives.

Little Things, part 1

Oct 16, 2012

Bob remembers a major event 50 years ago this month – the Cuban missile crisis, when it seemed the United States and Soviet Union were on the brink of nuclear war.  Bob was a young reporter for a small newspaper on the Outer Cape then. He wrote a column on the events of that time, calling it “Little Things,” evoking those events that make up our lives.

How Many Squirrels?

Oct 9, 2012

Salt Falls

Oct 2, 2012

gainesp2003 / http://www.flickr.com/photos/33403047@N00/

Robert Finch found himself one of the last people to see the summer's illustrious ursine visitor to Cape Cod.  Not long after he passed it on the road, authorities captured the bear for relocation.  Even before this chance encounter, he celebrated the bear's trek with poetry and historical recollection of nature's unending incursions. Check out the before-and-after essays.

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