All Things Considered on WCAI

Weekdays at 4:00pm

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

Find out more about each day's show here.

The Houston Astros have had a season to remember: 107 regular season wins against just 55 losses. The Astros are heavy favorites to win their second World Series in three years. The series starts Tuesday evening.

Yet a celebratory rant by a senior executive after they clinched the pennant over the weekend has shifted attention to unwelcome subjects off the field, including domestic violence and the team's handling of female reporters.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Houston Astros have had a season to remember. They beat the Yankees to take the American League pennant, and they're favored to win the World Series against the Washington Nationals, which kicks off tonight. But a celebratory rant by a senior executive after the Astros clinched the pennant over the weekend has shifted attention to subjects off the field, including domestic violence and the team's handling of female reporters. NPR's David Folkenflik has that story.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The protests that have taken over Chile's capital city show no sign of stopping.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Chanting in Spanish).

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Houston Astros have had a season to remember. They beat the Yankees to take the American League pennant, and they're favored to win the World Series against the Washington Nationals, which kicks off tonight. But a celebratory rant by a senior executive after the Astros clinched the pennant over the weekend has shifted attention to subjects off the field, including domestic violence and the team's handling of female reporters. NPR's David Folkenflik has that story.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As cars become smarter and safer, some members of Congress want to require them to be built to prevent drunk driving.

Sens. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Rick Scott, R-Fla., introduced legislation last week that would make it mandatory for all new cars and trucks to come loaded with passive, virtually unnoticeable, alcohol detection systems by 2024.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is what Lebanon sounds like tonight.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in foreign language).

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

If you've never heard the name Pierre Delecto, well, we don't blame you. His Twitter account opened in July of 2011, and it's tweeted only a few times, almost always to defend Republican Senator Mitt Romney.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Canadians are voting today on whether to keep Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party in power. The race is tight after revelations of scandals involving Trudeau. David McGuffin reports from Ottawa.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pages