Town of Chatham

Chatham, like many towns on the Cape, has a shrinking population. Younger people, specifically, are moving away. They cite high housing costs and a lack of jobs as some of the reasons they don't make Chatham a year-round home. In response, the town created the "Chatham 365 Task Force," made up largely of working families, to identify some ways to make it easier for people of all ages to live and work in town. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Select Board Chairperson and task force member Shareen Davis about their new, recently-released report.

Elsa Partan

Think climate change is too serious to joke about? Consider this.

With each new scientific report, the situation seems more dire. But the social and political will to address the issue has lagged.

Herman Hollerith's census card reader machine.
U.S. Census

The 2020 census is going digital. We recently brought you a story of how this technological innovation could lead to undercounting Native Americans who live on tribal land.

Today, we’re flipping that equation and rather than looking at how computer technology is affecting the census, we’re asking how the census has affected the development of computer technology.

U.S. Air Force photo, Anthony Nin Leclerec, https://tinyurl.com/yy6quhsp

Aquaculture is currently the third most lucrative fishery in New England after lobster and scallops. Oysters and, increasingly, kelp are two of the most commonly grown.

Now, a new study says aquaculture could also be an important way to address issues like nutrient pollution and habitat loss. In fact, that study found that New England’s waters are among the top twenty locations in the world with the greatest opportunities for restorative aquaculture.

Michelle@TNS, https://tinyurl.com/y2j54uub

For years, the advice has been the same – for a healthy heart, eat less red meat. And then, two weeks ago, an international panel of scientists released a review of the science that they said overturned the prevailing wisdom. In fact, they said it was based on poor-quality science and that eating red meat didn’t make a significant difference.

Mike, https://tinyurl.com/y2bg5avq

  • For years, the advice has been the same – for a healthy heart, eat less red meat. And then, two weeks ago, an international panel of scientists released a review of the science that they said overturned the prevailing wisdom. In fact, they said it was based on poor-quality science and that eating red meat didn’t make a significant difference.

That study has garnered lots of headlines and sparked plenty of criticism and controversy. Scott Lear says that high-profile disagreement and conflicting advice could do more harm than any specific recommendation.

Poetry Sunday: Eric Nelson

Oct 20, 2019

Eric Nelson reads his poem, "Crime Scene."  

Eve Zuckoff

WCAI News Director Steve Junker hosts a roundup of some of the top local and regional news of the week, including: a storm knocks out power to parts of the Cape and Islands, causing schools to close; the long-awaited shark safety study underwhelms many people with its conclusions; State Senator Vinny deMacedo announces his mid-term retirement; and a defaced Israeli flag draws widespread condemnation. 

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

About 200 Outer Cape residents and concerned citizens attended a community meeting at Nauset High School on Thursday to learn more about the recently released, long-awaited shark study conducted by the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy and the National Seashore about shark mitigation strategies.

Sam Houghton

A powerful storm hit the Cape and Islands on Wednesday night and continued through Thursday. Wind gusts from Wednesday night measured up to 90 miles per hour on the Outer Cape, and 78 miles per hour on the Upper Cape. 

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