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Diane Orson

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England. She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater. Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

  • Hank Bolden is one of thousands of U.S. soldiers exposed to secret nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s. He's now using compensation money from the federal government to focus on his first love: music.
  • A Connecticut attorney has opened a shop that combines his passion for the law with his barber skills. Donald Howard says he first got the hybrid-business idea working as a paralegal for a personal injury attorney who doubled as a sports agent. And, a California attorney opened Legal Grind, a coffee house and law office.
  • In the weeks following the killings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, more than a quarter-million cards, letters and gifts have arrived in Newtown, Conn. The town is trying to decide what to do with a collection that quickly outgrew its storage at the municipal building and now fills a warehouse.
  • Since the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings, gifts have come into the grief-stricken Connecticut community by the truckload. Parents say they're not sure how to celebrate, but some hope the traditions will bring back some sense of normalcy.
  • The test long used to demonstrate high school equivalency is getting an overhaul. Many educators agree it's time for an update, but the new GED will be much more expensive and administered only on computers. Some are worried the new exam will be out of reach for many test takers.
  • The town of East Haven, Ct., has reached a proposed agreement with the U.S. government to settle claims that police discriminated against Latinos there. Citizens accused the police of excessive force, intimidation and unlawful search and seizure.