The World on WCAI

Weekdays at 8:00pm

A one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe.

http://www.theworld.org/

The recent allegations against film mogul Harvey Weinstein have sparked a global conversation about the issue of sexual harassment in the workplace. We devoted all of Friday's episode of PRI's The World to workplace sexual harassment. Listen to the entire program below or scroll down to hear specific segments. 

Take our survey about sexual harassment in the workplace, below

Actor and director Asia Argento is fleeing her home country of Italy as a result of the “climate of tension” and “victim blaming” that has been lobbed at her there after she went public with rape allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

The Spanish government is threatening to revoke the autonomy of the region of Catalonia, in the northeast of the country. The Catalans, for their part, are threatening to declare independence unilaterally.

But what are the roots of the tensions between the national government in Madrid and the Catalan leaders in Barcelona?

"All voices are welcome in this world, you know. All experiments. I can't criticize anyone's voice, 'cuz people's voices are their soul. So how can you criticize one's soul?" 

That's what French singer Camille has to say about the unique voice of Yoko Ono. And you could say the same thing to describe Camille's. Hers is a subdued voice that can soon break out into a guttural cry, especially in the song "Twix." And yes, the song is about the candy bar. 

In Syria, all girls want is safety and school

Oct 19, 2017
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Zohra Bensemra/Reuters

Syria was once home to a robust, highly educated middle class.  

Books were an important part of the culture, and literacy was highly prized, for girls as well as boys. 

But the Syria's grinding six-year war has endangered all that — especially for young women. 

Many girls that might have received a rigorous education are now being married off at a young age. 

That's what journalist Gayle Tzemach Lemmon found out recently when she visited the Syrian town of Tabqa — outside of Raqqa.

The Czech Republic's Trump is in the lead for Prime Minister

Oct 19, 2017
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David W Cerny/Reuters

Dubbed the "Czech version of Trump" by Forbes, the wiry, gray-haired, Slovak-born farming, media and chemicals mogul is the Czech Republic's second-richest man.

Andrej Babis set up the populist ANO (Yes) party in 2011 as a political outsider determined to lure voters with promises of clean politics in the EU country of 10.6 million ranked more corrupt than Botswana by Transparency International.

ANO entered parliament two years later, but Babis himself has since been dogged by allegations of wrongdoing, something he flatly denies.

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Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters

Flying insect populations dropped by more than 75 percent during the last three decades in dozens of protected areas across Germany, researchers have found.

A club of mostly amateur entomologists used traps to capture insects and measure their biomass at 63 nature protection areas in Germany since 1989.

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Erik De Castro/Reuters

Mohammad Othman watched through a hole in the wall as the last ISIS fighters filed out of the Syrian city of Raqqa in a convoy of trucks and cars.

Exhausted, beaten and bedraggled, like the city itself, their departure marked a symbolic end to the self-declared caliphate — the fall of ISIS’ de facto capital was complete.

The first wave of university students displaced by Hurricane Maria has arrived to study in the mainland US, taking advantage of tuition discounts offered to Puerto Rican students whose home institutions remain shuttered.

“Coming here was a big relief,” says Rosamari Palerm, 23. She was the first student from Puerto Rico to arrive at St. Thomas University, a private Catholic school in Miami Gardens, Florida with over 5,000 students.

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Darrin Zammit Lupi/Reuters

A Maltese journalist once described as a “one-woman WikiLeaks” was killed in a car bomb this week.

Daphne Caruana Galizia was perhaps the most famous journalist in Malta, known for her fearless reporting on crime and corruption that reached into the upper echelons of the government.

Refugees to be assessed on ability to 'assimilate'

Oct 18, 2017

Immigration experts are trying to get clarification of a new presidential directive on refugees. One issue of concern is language buried deep in the document about the need for refugees to be “assimilated.”

Barbara Dane just can't recall any good fascist songs

Oct 18, 2017

"Can you recall any good fascist songs?" Barbara Dane, the founder of Paredon Records, asks.

Unlike fascist music, Dane recalls protest and struggle songs as having a rallying effect. Songs like "Deutschlandlied," which was chosen as Germany's national anthem in 1922 (today only the third stanza is used in the national anthem), can be pointed out as nationally successful. But fascist songs just don't seem to bring people together the way that protest music from folk culture does. 

Two US judges order a freeze on Trump's third travel ban

Oct 18, 2017
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James Lawler/Reuters

US federal judges ordered a freeze on President Donald Trump's newest travel ban this week, saying it was essentially targeted at Muslims in violation of the US Constitution.

Maryland District Judge Theodore Chuang said Wednesday the ban on travelers from over half a dozen countries essentially had not changed from the first two versions, which were shot down in lower courts as discriminating against a single religion.

Usually, when we talk about Japanese prison camps during World War II, the story centers around Japanese Americans. But there was actually another group whose story intertwines with the Japanese Americans' during the war.

Ron Moore knows this firsthand.

At the age of 11, he moved with his family to Poston, Arizona in 1949.  “We moved into one of the barracks,” he says.  

Those barracks were at the Colorado River Relocation Center, which is known as the Poston internment camp.

It was exactly one year ago today when Kurdish Peshmerga forces launched an offensive against ISIS in villages in the outlying areas of Mosul to pave the way for the Iraqi army to enter the city. I was there.

The night before the offensive, I was trying to catch some sleep but despite two coats and a sleeping bag, the cold made me shiver all night. Part of the reason for the sleeplessness was wondering what would happen next, now that the Kurdish army had joined the Iraqi army in a joint operation.

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