Eve Zuckoff

Eve Zuckoff is WCAI's Report for America reporter, covering the environment and the human impacts of climate change.  

Her beat centers not only around the challenges climate change poses to Cape Cod communities, but on the solutions and innovations that individuals and organizations seek to implement.   

Eve came to WCAI from WBUR, where she worked on Radio Boston, a daily news magazine program and "Last Seen," an investigative podcast that looked into the 1990 Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist.

As a lifelong Massachusetts resident, she loves covering the community she grew up in and snacking on the world's best seafood along the way.  

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Entanglement in fishing gear is the suspected cause of death for some of the eight North Atlantic right whales found dead in recent weeks.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada / Fisheries and Oceans Canada

 

 

At the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown, Christy Hudak, a researcher in the Right Whale Ecology Program, leaned over a microscope looking at a water sample, counting and categorizing different kinds of plankton.  

“Right whales love specific type of plankton, which are called copepods. They are more of a tiny  crustacean plankton—think of crabs, or shrimp,” Hodak said. 
 

For decades, endangered right whales spent summers in Canadian waters like the Bay of Fundy and the Roseway Basin, feasting on these copepods.  But copepod numbers in those places have fallen in recent years. 

Eve Zuckoff

In the last month, eight North Atlantic right whales have been found dead in Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence, including two members of the critically endangered species this past week.  

 

Canadian authorities say work to determine these new whales' cause of death is ongoing.

Whatever the cause of these latest deaths, researchers worry collisions with ships are increasingly to blame.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

A new report predicts coastal communities in the Northeast will be hit harder by high tide flooding than any other region in the country.  

Eve Zuckoff

Hundreds of spectators crowded onto West Dennis beach Tuesday night to watch volunteers and scientists from the New England Aquarium release a 340 lb loggerhead sea turtle back into the ocean. 

She's the the largest loggerhead ever rescued and rehabilitated in New England. Her name is Munchkin. 

Eve Zuckoff

 

On a typical June evening at Santuit Pond in Mashpee, fishermen like Ted Kingsley can be found perched by the shore, or wading through the water, looking for bass. 

“The [deepest] I've been -- up to my ankles in it, maybe,” Kingsley said.   

 

He said he won’t go in past his ankles, though; something about the water isn’t right.