Opioid Epidemic

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

Cape Cod has one of the highest number of sober houses per capita of any region in the state, a result of the draw of well-known addiction treatment centers like Gosnold. But the high number of sober homes can make relationships with the community uneasy.

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

 

 

Sober houses are places where addicts can continue their recovery after completing formal medical treatment. Falmouth has one of the highest number of these homes per capita of any town in Massachusetts, in part due to the presence of the addiction treatment center Gosnold. 

A new model finds it will take a lot of changes to fix the opioid addiction crisis.
Nick Youngson, https://tinyurl.com/y8h2b3ke

There are computer models that help gauge the likely outcomes of any number of decisions – whether it’s the Federal Reserve raising interest rates, a new climate policy, or even what you choose to eat for breakfast.

That hasn't been the case for the opioid epidemic. Now, researchers at Stanford University have developed a computer model of the epidemic that they hope can help point policymakers toward effective strategies.

Sarah Tan / WCAI

 

New Bedford has some of the highest rates of opioid overdose-related deaths in the state, and as the toll continues to rise, the New Bedford police department is considering some new approaches.

President Trump is widely expected to declare the opioid addiction epidemic a national emergency. What tools do we have to fight addiction, and what else do health care providers need? Dr. Jeffrey Baxter of U Mass Medical School joins us.

The hippocampus is part of the brain responsible for forming and storing memories. In fourteen cases, opioid use has been linked to complete shutdown of blood flow to the region.
Gray's Anatomy / Wikimedia Commons, public domain

As if the epidemic of opioid addiction and overdoses isn’t bad enough, a new study finds that – in a very small number of cases – opioid use has been linked to profound memory loss. It’s kind of a medical mystery story that started in November of 2015. That’s when Dr. Jed Barash, a neurologist at Lahey Hospital and Medical Center in Burlington, MA, brought four patients to the attention of officials at the Department of Public Health.