Pilgrim Nuclear Plant

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

Members of the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission visited Plymouth on Wednesday to hear feedback about creating Citizens Advisory Panels around decommissioning nuclear power plants. Many attending the meeting used the chance to voice frustration and disappointment at the recent decision to allow decommissioning company Holtec to take over ownership of Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station.

NRC.gov

Nuclear decommissioning company Holtec has officially been approved to take over the license for Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth. The decision comes amid a flurry of concern from nuclear watchdogs over the company's financial stability and their ability to decommission the plant safely. Two hearing requests were made to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to look into Holtec's history, one from watchdog group Pilgrim Watch, and another from State Attorney General Maura Healey's office. The Commission decided to forgo both hearings. 
 

NRC.gov

 

The federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced it is approaching a decision on the Pilgrim Nuclear Powerplant license transfer, and that it could happen as early as next week.  

 

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

The federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission says Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station has been improving its safety since 2016, but the official reclassification from one of the worst performing plants in the country was held off to make sure the positive changes could be sustained.

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station is nearly 50 years old. It’s moving toward a permanent shutdown in four months, but there are still concerns about safety. When a nuclear power plant closes, it leaves radioactive waste, and a lot of unanswered questions.

wikipedia

The Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth is one of the worst performing power plants in the country, and it’s scheduled to shut down permanently in June.  Pilgrim has been supplying the region with power since 1989. While the plant’s closure is good news to many residents who have concerns about safety at the plant, decommissioning and what happens to the spent fuel presents another host of potential safety concerns. On The Point, we discuss the Pilgrim Nuclear power plant; past, present and future.

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

 

When Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station closes in May of this year, it will mark a turning point for the town of Plymouth, for nuclear power in the region, and for one woman, who’s been working to shut down Pilgrim for three decades.

Sarah Mizes-Tan / WCAI

 

 

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth is one of the worst performing power plants in the country, and it’s scheduled to shut down permanently in four months. Built in the 1970s, it's been continuously supplying the region with power since 1989, but for security reasons, only a few people besides employees have been inside. 

 

Sarah Tan / WCAI

The Nuclear Decommissioning Citizens Advisory Panel expressed deep skepticism regarding Entergy's decision to sell the Pilgrim powerplant in Plymouth on Wednesday night. Entergy is looking to sell the plant to a joint company after it officially closes in June 2019.

NRC.gov

 

Entergy Corporation announced it will be looking to sell Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth to Holtech International, a company they say is more experienced in nuclear decommissioning.

 

 

Courtesy of Entergy

The Nuclear Decommissioning Citizens Advisory Panel met on Thursday to vote on new recommendations they will send to the state regarding the decommissioning of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant. The plant has been plagued by outages in the last year and is scheduled to be shut down next May.

Sarah Tan / WCAI

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) met on Tuesday evening for their annual safety assessment of the Pilgrim power plant in Plymouth. After a presentation from officials of Entergy, the company that owns the plant, the commission deemed the site improving, but still in need of its highest tier of oversight.