The Fishing News

    

with Steve Junker

Each week during saltwater fishing season Steve Junker checks in with the folks at On the Water magazine and others to find out who's catching what where around the Cape and Islands—and how they're doing it.  

For a detailed weekly Fishing Forecast, check out On the Water.

Earlier seasons of The Fishing News are available on our archives page.
 

The Fishing News is made possible in part with support from Arey's Pond Boat Yard on Pleasant Bay in Orleans.

 

S Junker

They're speedy fish with good eyesight, and they're terribly picky. False albacore are back, to the delight of many local anglers. With their blitz-and-disappear behavior, they have fishermen on edge, waiting for the next eruption.

S. Junker

An unusual catch sparked interest this week: juvenile bonito were being taken in numbers at a few spots on Cape Cod Bay east of the Canal. We talk about it in this week's Fishing News, and look at the seasonal change that means good opportunities for shore fishermen.  

S Junker

Just one month ago, a lot of local fishermen were scratching their heads and wondering where the bluefish were. We had gone deep into the season without seeing these voracious fish in any numbers. Well, guess what. If you're heading out this weekend, you may be lucky if you don't run into bluefish. Now they seem to be everywhere. 

S Junker

There are a few fish that appear in Cape Cod waters that will, by a mere mention, get fishermen jabbering with enthusiasm. Bonito certainly fall into that class. They're easy to talk about and hard to catch. And delicious to eat.

http://www.agu.org

Normally, this is prime time for bluefin tuna fishing, but so far it's been a bit quiet. There’s an idea that the phenomenal bluefin action happening this year off northern New Jersey may be related—that those fish are the ones we're missing.

N. Carolina DNR goo.gl/8YR4eA

Last year king mackerel showed up in our waters, to the surprise of many anglers. Now, it looks like we're seeing them again this year. If you’ve got your sights set on catching a “smoker,” here’s a simple how-to.

S Junker

"Where are the bluefish?" It's a puzzler. Most years, blues are as plentiful as squirrels on the village green, popping up where they aren't wanted, a nuisance to fishermen targeting more glamorous species like striped bass.

Not this year.

Amy Vince

It's seven miles long and offers some of the best shore fishing anywhere. Welcome to the Cape Cod Canal. 

Andy Nabreski

In the last few years, offshore fishermen from the Cape have started to adopt a technique more commonly used in southern waters. It's called deep dropping, and it means fishing more than a quarter-mile deep, using electric reels and as much as eight pounds of sinker weight.

Nils Rinaldi / flickr / goo.gl/uTtYFg

Set aside what you think you know about fly fishing. It doesn't always happen on mountain streams. There's plenty of saltwater fly fishing going on around the Cape, with anglers picking up bluefish and striped bass. 

S Junker

Lurking along sandy bottoms, ready to pounce on a passing baitfish or tasy morsel, is the summer flounder. Here's what you need to know about this great eating fish—where to search it out, and what kind of rig to use.  Plus, we've got a roundup of the week's fishing action.  

Chris Bentley / flickr

Some days it seems like none of your old standby spots, or lures, or tricks are working. So what then? For fishermen, it's a serious question.

S Junker

You hear plenty of talk about tides, when people ask about fishing. But just as important—maybe more important—is the effect of current. Particularly in shoaling areas, the flow of current over rapidly shallowing bottom creates turbulence—what fishermen call "rips"—that can be just the spot to find stripers, bluefish, and even fluke.

Steve Junker

Perhaps the strangest fish you can pull out of our local waters is the sea robin. Maybe those aren't really wings, but they do look like them. And it has feelers. And for sure, it does croak.

Steve Junker

Black sea bass season opened on May 19th, and there have been reports of very good fishing. If you don’t know a sea bass from a striped bass, don’t worry—here’s what you need to know.

Pages